ABOUT ONN | HOW TO GET IT | ADVERTISE WITH ONN | CONTACT US
  Home | World |Business | Health & Community | Entertainment | Opinion | Directory | JobHeart
 
 

FREE COPIES
Available all over
the Twin Cities!

One Nation News

DOWNLOAD
This weeks
issue as a PDF!
(1.5MB)

Headlines for Sunday, February 16, 2020
 
For Email Marketing you can trust

Advertise with One Nation News

THE ONN CALENDAR
Click here to view >>

ARE YOU A WRITER?
If you are interested in contributing content to ONN, please download our writer's contract pdf.

 


 

2020 Oscars similar to 1939 Oscars in awarding one black talent
by Jay Connor/the Root

On February 29, 1940, Hattie McDaniel, arguably the most well-known black actress in the entire world at the time, took to the podium at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub inside the legendary Ambassador Hotel, in Los Angeles, to accept her Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress—the first ever for a black entertainer.

Adorned in a dazzling turquoise gown—her hair kissed by white gardenias—McDaniel shook presenter Fay Bainter’s hand then nodded toward the audience, their raucous applause turning into dutiful silence.

“Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, fellow members of the motion picture industry and honored guests,” she began. “This is one of the happiest moments of my life, and I want to thank each one of you who had a part in selecting me for one of the their awards, for your kindness. It has made me feel very, very humble.”

She continued, “I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything that I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope I shall always be a credit to my race and to the motion picture industry. My heart is too full to tell you just how I feel, and may I say thank you and God bless you.”

Consumed by the magnitude of the moment, the 46-year old actress then burst into tears as she walked past an extravagant table where her white Gone With the Wind co-stars were gathered, returning to her seat, which was elsewhere as a provision of her attendance.

Because while her critically acclaimed performance as a subservient black woman was good enough for an Oscar, explicit permission from Gone With the Wind producer David O. Selznick was required for that same black woman to accept it (the hotel adhered to a strict no-blacks policy until 1959).

McDaniel would later rebuke the onslaught of criticism she bore for embracing stereotypical roles with a curt, “I’d rather play a maid than be one.”

Eighty years later, watching the latest iteration of the Academy Awards, it’s evident that very little has changed. Out of 20 acting nominees, 18 were white, and the only female directors to be found were on Natalie Portman’s cape on the red carpet.

Read more at: TheRoot.com

 





 
 

WORLD | BUSINESS | COMMUNITY | ENTERTAINMENT | OPINION | SPORTS | CLASSIFIED
HOME | ABOUT ONN | HOW TO GET IT | ADVERTISE WITH ONN | CONTACT US
©2005 Black Heart Publishing. All rights reserved,